Your Questions About Brake Repair Tools

Sandra asks…

How to reset a tire pressure sensor fault?

Two weeks ago I had a tire repaired on my 2008 Ford Fusion and now I have a tire pressure sensor fault code. I doubt that the sensor was damaged since it took two weeks for the code to come up. Also am I going to have this problem every time I have work done on my tires?

answers:

Follow the instructions in your owners manual.

1. Inflate all tires to the pressure listed on the Tire Load and Inflation placard inside the drivers door
2. Turn the ignition to the OFF position, then press and release the brake pedal
3. Cycle the Ignition from OFF to RUN position 3 times ending in the RUN position
4. Press and release the brake pedal
5. Do the Ignition cycle thing again
6. The horn will sound once and the TPMS light wil blink once when training mode is initiated and if you have Message Center it will read TRAIN LF TIRE. From here you place the antenna of the TPMS programmer tool (you don’t have one of these) on the sidewall of the tire 180-deg from the valve stem to activate the sensor. The horn will sound once when the sensor has been learned. Repeat the process for the RF, RR and LR tires in that order.
7. When done the message center will display TRAINING MODE COMPLETE.

But all of this should only be necessary when replacing a sensor. For routine tire services the sensors are motion activated and should reset just by driving the car so long as the tires are properly inflated.

Richard asks…

How do I get a job as a automotive technician ?

I’m still going to school.

I have a basic tool set (doubt that will even help me but eh..) My friend said reading books won’t help much, so I’m trying to get some hands on training, then go to a dealership and work my way up.

How exactly do I do that? Do I just go to an independent shop and ask them to train me? Where do I start?

Also, what do I need to know and what tools do I need?

Thanks.

answers:

You could spend years working your way up. The first thing you need to ask yourself; am I mechanically inclined?

Being an automotive tech requires a wide range of skills not just turning a wrench, you will need diagnostic skills (an ability to understand why things fail), welding, an understanding of basic electrical systems, air conditioning, brakes, chassis. Cars in this age are very complex machines with computers on board diagnostic systems, sensors. Some will tell you all you need to do is plug in the scanner and the computer will tell what the vehicle needs. That is rarely the case.

The two best ways not to spend years at the local Sears (where you could probably start now as a tire changer) is first and foremost WyoTech any who graduates for WyoTech will almost walk in the door and get the job. This dose not mean you will not start at the bottom, but if you have what it takes it will guarantee a much faster rise to the $$$.

The second is most any local JC has an accredited automotive repair program most are far less expensive and with many very good teachers.

Trying to find a shop to teach you this skill anymore is almost impossible no one has the time or the patients. Shop owners need to move cars in and out in order to keep in business and having some rookie break things, spend ten hours for what should take two hours just don’t work. Rack space is money and the difference between making payday and not making payday ie. I can make enough to pay you on Friday

you can expect to pay $7,000 to $10,000 for your basic tool requirements. Some guys go into hawk with Snap-on other buy more tools every week. You can spend $3K to $5K just on a good tool box. Most guys spend years acquiring tools.

Sears, Big O Tires and so on are the best places if you are looking for an entry level position.

And take seriously what Zach said above

Lisa asks…

How do you pull off the rear break drum on a 2010 Toyota Corolla?

I’ve attempted repairing the brake pads on my 2010 Toyota Corolla and the from pads were real simple. I thought since it is a 2010 it would be just as simple in the rear but they look totally different. I’m not sure if the rear brakes are drum or disc. They look like drums. My problem is that I don’t know how to remove whatever is there behind the tire to access the brake pads. Can someone help please?

answers:

There is a slot in the backing plate which has a rubber plug in it. After you remove the plug use a brake adjusting tool to loosen the brake shoes so that the lip which has formed on the drum will slide over the compressed shoes. The brake tool engages the points in the star wheel.

Michael asks…

how much does it cost to restore a mgb to running condition. on average?

I want to restore a small sports car to running condition, just to tool around town. I would like any information on how much it might cost to restore one on average. I understand that this is tough to answer but would like any advice that you might have on the cost of restoring it.

answers:

I’m not very familiar with your car so I am basing my answer on old cars in general.The other writers make valid points about bodywork etc, but I’m going to go under the premise you just want to get it running and not do a complete restoration if possible. I am also taking it for granted the engine and transmission are solid and the car just hasn’t been run for a while and was stored under good conditions (indoors) and not in a backyard for 25 years. I can’t give you a dollar figure but I’ll list what I would do and then you can get the prices from parts houses or repair shops if you’re not going to do the work yourself. For the engine: Remove the spark plugs and squirt some oil in the cylinders. Turn the engine over a few times by hand. There will be at least some surface rust in the cylinders and you don’t want to scrape it off with dry rings. Once that is done replace the following parts: Plugs, points, condenser, cap rotor, wires, fuel filter, air filter. It wouldn’t be a bad idea to disassemble the distributor, clean everything up, and make sure the advance weights and springs move freely. Change oil and filter (if equipped). Remove the starter and test it with jumper cables. If it’s just a little sluggish take it apart, clean it, lube the bearings. If it’s dead or completely rusted inside, replace it. Electrical: Install a new battery, replace cables, check all electrical connections throughout the car for corrosion. Replace headlight bulbs, turn signal bulbs, brake light bulbs. Fuel system: rebuild or replace the carburetor. Remove the fuel tank and have it boiled out by a shop to remove rust. (Many radiator repair shops can do it) Check metal fuel lines, replace any flexible lines, rebuild or replace the fuel pump. Drivetrain: The clutch itself may still be usable at least for a short period of time but be prepared to replace it. Change transmission oil, clean clutch and shift linkage. Some older cars had grease fittings on the clutch linkage and if that’s the case with your car, by this time any old lubricant has become a petrified glob of hardened crud. If no grease fittings, take the clutch and shift linkage apart and clean them. Check universal joints. If they have grease fittings then grease them but be prepared to replace them especially after they are put back in service. There’s a good chance they could be rusty inside and after a short time will need to be replaced. Drain and refill rear end lubricant. There’s probably no drain plug so you’ll need a suction gun or if there is a removable cover plate, remove the plate and clean whatever you can reach by hand. Steering: Check lubricant in the steering box, grease the front end, check for wear. Brakes: Rebuild or replace the master cylinder and all wheel cylinders. Replace brake shoes and springs. Have all drums cut to remove rust. If they are maxed out or severely warped and out of round, replace them. Repack or replace all wheel bearings and replace grease seals. If you’re not very familiar with the car expect things to go wrong which may not occur to you now. For instance if I found an old 8 cylinder Ford Mustang that hadn’t been driven in 25 years I’d replace the timing chain because it was an item known to wear out at about 75,000 miles. If the car had been sitting for a long time then put back in service I’d be foolish not to replace the chain even if I got the car running. A lot is going to depend on how it was stored. If it was up on blocks in a garage you stand a good chance of doing just the things I mentioned to get it drivable. If it has been out in a field for 25 years, subject to the weather, mice, etc, be prepared for a full restoration before you even think of driving it. It might be worth the time and cost to have it towed to a mechanic you trust and pay him to go over the car and tell you if it’s worth trying to fix up to drive without a complete rebuild and-or restoration. It’s one thing to get it running and go up and down the driveway. It’s another thing to drive it on the street.

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Your Questions About Brake Repair Tools

Jenny asks…

How to reset a tire pressure sensor fault?

Two weeks ago I had a tire repaired on my 2008 Ford Fusion and now I have a tire pressure sensor fault code. I doubt that the sensor was damaged since it took two weeks for the code to come up. Also am I going to have this problem every time I have work done on my tires?

answers:

Follow the instructions in your owners manual.

1. Inflate all tires to the pressure listed on the Tire Load and Inflation placard inside the drivers door
2. Turn the ignition to the OFF position, then press and release the brake pedal
3. Cycle the Ignition from OFF to RUN position 3 times ending in the RUN position
4. Press and release the brake pedal
5. Do the Ignition cycle thing again
6. The horn will sound once and the TPMS light wil blink once when training mode is initiated and if you have Message Center it will read TRAIN LF TIRE. From here you place the antenna of the TPMS programmer tool (you don’t have one of these) on the sidewall of the tire 180-deg from the valve stem to activate the sensor. The horn will sound once when the sensor has been learned. Repeat the process for the RF, RR and LR tires in that order.
7. When done the message center will display TRAINING MODE COMPLETE.

But all of this should only be necessary when replacing a sensor. For routine tire services the sensors are motion activated and should reset just by driving the car so long as the tires are properly inflated.

Paul asks…

How do I get a job as a automotive technician ?

I’m still going to school.

I have a basic tool set (doubt that will even help me but eh..) My friend said reading books won’t help much, so I’m trying to get some hands on training, then go to a dealership and work my way up.

How exactly do I do that? Do I just go to an independent shop and ask them to train me? Where do I start?

Also, what do I need to know and what tools do I need?

Thanks.

answers:

You could spend years working your way up. The first thing you need to ask yourself; am I mechanically inclined?

Being an automotive tech requires a wide range of skills not just turning a wrench, you will need diagnostic skills (an ability to understand why things fail), welding, an understanding of basic electrical systems, air conditioning, brakes, chassis. Cars in this age are very complex machines with computers on board diagnostic systems, sensors. Some will tell you all you need to do is plug in the scanner and the computer will tell what the vehicle needs. That is rarely the case.

The two best ways not to spend years at the local Sears (where you could probably start now as a tire changer) is first and foremost WyoTech any who graduates for WyoTech will almost walk in the door and get the job. This dose not mean you will not start at the bottom, but if you have what it takes it will guarantee a much faster rise to the $$$.

The second is most any local JC has an accredited automotive repair program most are far less expensive and with many very good teachers.

Trying to find a shop to teach you this skill anymore is almost impossible no one has the time or the patients. Shop owners need to move cars in and out in order to keep in business and having some rookie break things, spend ten hours for what should take two hours just don’t work. Rack space is money and the difference between making payday and not making payday ie. I can make enough to pay you on Friday

you can expect to pay $7,000 to $10,000 for your basic tool requirements. Some guys go into hawk with Snap-on other buy more tools every week. You can spend $3K to $5K just on a good tool box. Most guys spend years acquiring tools.

Sears, Big O Tires and so on are the best places if you are looking for an entry level position.

And take seriously what Zach said above

Helen asks…

How do you pull off the rear break drum on a 2010 Toyota Corolla?

I’ve attempted repairing the brake pads on my 2010 Toyota Corolla and the from pads were real simple. I thought since it is a 2010 it would be just as simple in the rear but they look totally different. I’m not sure if the rear brakes are drum or disc. They look like drums. My problem is that I don’t know how to remove whatever is there behind the tire to access the brake pads. Can someone help please?

answers:

There is a slot in the backing plate which has a rubber plug in it. After you remove the plug use a brake adjusting tool to loosen the brake shoes so that the lip which has formed on the drum will slide over the compressed shoes. The brake tool engages the points in the star wheel.

Lisa asks…

how much does it cost to restore a mgb to running condition. on average?

I want to restore a small sports car to running condition, just to tool around town. I would like any information on how much it might cost to restore one on average. I understand that this is tough to answer but would like any advice that you might have on the cost of restoring it.

answers:

I’m not very familiar with your car so I am basing my answer on old cars in general.The other writers make valid points about bodywork etc, but I’m going to go under the premise you just want to get it running and not do a complete restoration if possible. I am also taking it for granted the engine and transmission are solid and the car just hasn’t been run for a while and was stored under good conditions (indoors) and not in a backyard for 25 years. I can’t give you a dollar figure but I’ll list what I would do and then you can get the prices from parts houses or repair shops if you’re not going to do the work yourself. For the engine: Remove the spark plugs and squirt some oil in the cylinders. Turn the engine over a few times by hand. There will be at least some surface rust in the cylinders and you don’t want to scrape it off with dry rings. Once that is done replace the following parts: Plugs, points, condenser, cap rotor, wires, fuel filter, air filter. It wouldn’t be a bad idea to disassemble the distributor, clean everything up, and make sure the advance weights and springs move freely. Change oil and filter (if equipped). Remove the starter and test it with jumper cables. If it’s just a little sluggish take it apart, clean it, lube the bearings. If it’s dead or completely rusted inside, replace it. Electrical: Install a new battery, replace cables, check all electrical connections throughout the car for corrosion. Replace headlight bulbs, turn signal bulbs, brake light bulbs. Fuel system: rebuild or replace the carburetor. Remove the fuel tank and have it boiled out by a shop to remove rust. (Many radiator repair shops can do it) Check metal fuel lines, replace any flexible lines, rebuild or replace the fuel pump. Drivetrain: The clutch itself may still be usable at least for a short period of time but be prepared to replace it. Change transmission oil, clean clutch and shift linkage. Some older cars had grease fittings on the clutch linkage and if that’s the case with your car, by this time any old lubricant has become a petrified glob of hardened crud. If no grease fittings, take the clutch and shift linkage apart and clean them. Check universal joints. If they have grease fittings then grease them but be prepared to replace them especially after they are put back in service. There’s a good chance they could be rusty inside and after a short time will need to be replaced. Drain and refill rear end lubricant. There’s probably no drain plug so you’ll need a suction gun or if there is a removable cover plate, remove the plate and clean whatever you can reach by hand. Steering: Check lubricant in the steering box, grease the front end, check for wear. Brakes: Rebuild or replace the master cylinder and all wheel cylinders. Replace brake shoes and springs. Have all drums cut to remove rust. If they are maxed out or severely warped and out of round, replace them. Repack or replace all wheel bearings and replace grease seals. If you’re not very familiar with the car expect things to go wrong which may not occur to you now. For instance if I found an old 8 cylinder Ford Mustang that hadn’t been driven in 25 years I’d replace the timing chain because it was an item known to wear out at about 75,000 miles. If the car had been sitting for a long time then put back in service I’d be foolish not to replace the chain even if I got the car running. A lot is going to depend on how it was stored. If it was up on blocks in a garage you stand a good chance of doing just the things I mentioned to get it drivable. If it has been out in a field for 25 years, subject to the weather, mice, etc, be prepared for a full restoration before you even think of driving it. It might be worth the time and cost to have it towed to a mechanic you trust and pay him to go over the car and tell you if it’s worth trying to fix up to drive without a complete rebuild and-or restoration. It’s one thing to get it running and go up and down the driveway. It’s another thing to drive it on the street.

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